Concussion Safety in Baseball

Concussion Safety in Baseball

Even though baseball is considered a non-contact sport, concussion or other head injuries can occur in baseball players.

Baseball Safety and Concussions

Even though baseball is considered a non-contact sport, concussion or other head injuries can occur in baseball players. Even in sports where they occur less frequently parents, athletes, and coaches must be educated on concussions and what to do to protect the athlete.

Concussions may also occur in baseball when athletes:

  • Collide with teammates or opponent
  • Run into fences, walls, or backstops
  • Are hit by a ball or bat

Other signs to look for when an athlete may have a concussion:

  • Severe and consistent headache
  • Blurred vision, double vision, seeing stars
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Changes in mood and behavior
  • Poor balance or coordination
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Vacant stare and hard to concentrate
  • Memory loss and hard to remember simple tasks

Concussion Management

Any athlete showing any signs or complaining of any symptoms of a concussion should be immediately removed from practice or a game and have an evaluation by a qualified medical professional. The player should never be left alone or return to play on the same day of the injury.

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